Our Human Upcoming in an Age of Synthetic Intelligence

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“Advances in AI are going to happen, but the destination that we get to with those advances is up to us, and it is far from certain,” says Huttenlocher, who is also the Henry Ellis Warren Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Along with former Google CEO Eric Schmidt and elder statesman Henry Kissinger, Huttenlocher recently explored some of the quandaries posed by the rise of AI, in the book, “The Age of AI: And Our Human Future.” For Huttenlocher and his co-authors, “Our belief is that, to get there, we need much more informed dialogue and much more multilateral dialogue. Our hope is that the book will get people interested in doing that from a broad range of places,” he says.

Now, with nearly two and a half years as the college dean, Huttenlocher doesn’t just talk the talk when it comes to interdisciplinarity. He is leading the college as it incorporates computer science into …

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The back links among Artificial Intelligence and human legal rights at the coronary heart of the Large-Stage celebration of Monday 4th April – Presidency of Italy

The impression of Artificial Intelligence on human legal rights, democracy and the Rule of Law in making a individual-welcoming foreseeable future is the topic about which the Significant-Degree party being hosted on Monday 4th April will revolve. It is getting held by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Global Cooperation and co-organised by the Italian Presidency of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe and the Council of Europe as part of the Italian Semester programme of functions.

The assembly will choose put at the Farnesina starting up from 10.30am with speeches by Undersecretary Benedetto Della Vedova and the Deputy Secretary Normal of the Council of Europe Bjơrn Berge, followed by Hon. Alessandro Fusacchia, President of the Parliamentary intergroup on artificial intelligence. Paola Pisano will moderate (scientific skilled of the Minister Luigi Di Maio for the electronic financial system and evolution). It will also see the participation of reps of the European Commission, as perfectly as from the globe of academia, from sector and from establishments. This signifies the vital stage in confirming Europe as a position of reference for the planet in this area that is at the coronary heart of the reflections. The effects of Artificial Intelligence will thus be examined in depth from the point of view of the European Union  (by Kilian Gross, Artificial Intelligence Coverage Enhancement and Coordination, European Commission, who will investigate their romantic relationship from a European point of view),  of the tutorial planet (from Virginia Dignum, Umeå College), of ethics (from Paolo Benanti, Gregorian College), and of that of sector, hunting at business enterprise types (from Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft), and the safety of children’s rights (with Guido Scorza, Italian Knowledge Safety Authority).

The conclusions will provide an in-depth

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Artificial intelligence is being used to digitally replicate human voices : NPR

Reporter Chloe Veltman reacts to hearing her digital voice double, “Chloney,” for the first time, with Speech Morphing chief linguist Mark Seligman.

Courtesy of Speech Morphing


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Courtesy of Speech Morphing


Reporter Chloe Veltman reacts to hearing her digital voice double, “Chloney,” for the first time, with Speech Morphing chief linguist Mark Seligman.

Courtesy of Speech Morphing

The science behind making machines talk just like humans is very complex, because our speech patterns are so nuanced.

“The voice is not easy to grasp,” says Klaus Scherer, emeritus professor of the psychology of emotion at the University of Geneva. “To analyze the voice really requires quite a lot of knowledge about acoustics, vocal mechanisms and physiological aspects. So it is necessarily interdisciplinary, and quite demanding in terms of what you need to master in order to do anything of consequence.”

So it’s not surprisingly taken well over 200 years for synthetic voices to get from the first speaking machine, invented by Wolfgang von Kempelen around 1800 – a boxlike contraption that used bellows, pipes and a rubber mouth and nose to simulate a few recognizably human utterances, like mama and papa – to a Samuel L. Jackson voice clone delivering the weather report on Alexa today.

A model replica of Wolfgang von Kempelen’s Speaking Machine.

Fabian Brackhane


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Fabian Brackhane


A model replica of Wolfgang von Kempelen’s Speaking Machine.

Fabian Brackhane

Talking machines like Siri, Google Assistant and Alexa, or a bank’s automated customer service line, are now sounding quite human. Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence, or AI, we’ve reached a point where it’s sometimes difficult to distinguish synthetic voices from real ones.

I wanted to find out what’s involved in the process at the customer end. So I approached San Francisco

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